What information should you include in your logo? Are there any legal requirements? How much is too much? How should you construct your logo?

In reality, mission statements are the opening gambit for shareholder annual reports and business propositions are the weapon of choice for acquiring funding.

So what about your brand, product or service position in your marketplace? How do you create your tag line? Is one even needed? Should it be part of your logo?

 


1. Obviously, the starting place is your company name. If you have one. This is important to get right, and it’s worth taking the time to explore all possibilities.

See What’s in a Company name?

 


2. Should you include your company’s legal status? It’s not a legal requirement, and many organisations do include it, particularly tradition firms and LLP’s. However, nowadays, when you need immediate impact, recall and creative positioning from your logo, it is advised to leave it off unless it is a given in your particular industry and has commercial benefit.

 


3. Some family-owned, traditional or luxury companies will incorporate an established date to emphasise heritage. This approach is particularly useful for local tradespeople, where reputation and credibility are essential. For most, it isn’t necessary.

 


4. A few years back, it was necessary and quite common to attach your suffix to your logo. It has now become less essential and unnecessary. It is no longer needed to find a site and really should be included in your links, address and contact details, not your logo. 

 


5. So what about your brand, product or service position in your marketplace? How do you create your tag line? Is one even needed? Should it be part of your logo?

 


6. And then, there is an option for a symbol or device. The whole logo could be a symbol, or the symbol could be a separate element.

 


 

When all possibilities are considered, there are far too many elements to construct a memorable logo. So, what is the best approach?

Our conclusion is:-

In today’s business world, less really is more, particularly when it comes to branding and your logo. Simplicity, impact and recall are the key ingredients to creating a successful logo.  

No matter how your logo is designed, try to have no more than three separate elements.

Keep it simple:-

 


 

Finally, it’s worth noting that when you commission a logo, you must consider its primary usage. It used to be straightforward with letterheads and brochures as the format was less critical.

Then, with desktops and laptops becoming widely used, the preferred format was horizontal to accommodate screen widths. Now, with smartphones being the computer of choice for many, a more square or round format tends to work best in a vertical shape.

 


 

If you have any questions or queries about this article, please get in touch.

 

Some related articles:-

How much should you pay for a logo?

How do you brief a logo designer?

See Start-ups and Entrepreneurs

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